Petya's opening remarks

WordCamp Europe 2016 Slides & Photos

Last Friday, I presented a talk about the Japanese WordPress community at WordCamp Europe 2016 in Vienna.

The video will be published on WordPress.tv at some point. Meanwhile, here are some points for those who had missed it:

  • Japanese is the most widely used non-English WP locale (12.3% of non-English locales)
  • WordPress is by far the most popular CMS in Japan today (78.5% share – higher number compared to 59.5% for English sites)
  • Meetups are held almost every weekend somewhere in Japan. We make it easy to see events across Japan through the WordBench website and the event calendar. Many of the chapters create unique banners for each event.
  • The online community is also active, with many contributors on translation, documentation, support, bug fix & report, and Wapuu too!
  • Show others how to get involved, recognize their hard work, and help out.
  • Your own contribution can be multiplied if you help others to contribute. It’s necessary to grow the community for WordPress to succeed.

It was a pleasure to have had an opportunity to share what I’ve seen in the local community for the past 13 years. As I said in the talk, my goal is to help others contribute to WordPress so the “small steps” of more people can build up to form a long stride. Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions!

Day 0 (WCEU Picnic) Photos

Francesca and I hosted a picnic at Burggarten near the venue on Thursday.

#wceupicnic #wceu #wceu2016

A post shared by Naoko Takano (@naokomc) on

Day 1 Photos

Day 2 Photos

The childcare support at WCEU this year was really great.

Thanks #wceu organizing team for arranging a visit to the children's museum. It was fun! 💕

A post shared by Naoko Takano (@naokomc) on

Photos: Contributor Day

Having discussion face-to-face was the best part of the Contributor Day.

WordCamp Mumbai 2016 Swag

WordCamp Mumbai 2016 Slides and Photos

Over the weekend, I had the privilege to visit India for the first time to attend WordCamp Mumbai. I had a great time and had yet another realization that going to a WordCamp is a great way to visit a new place.

WordCamp Mumbai 2016 Swag

WordCamp Mumbai 2016 Swag

I talked about how WordPress became popular in Japan over the years and shared some tips to grow community or business.

My talk was right before lunch on the second day, so I had an opportunity to chat with several people who were interested in translation and meetups. I felt that it was well worth the trip when I could talk to Hindi, Marathi, and Tibetan translators who wanted to get involved more.

…and I got to introduce Wappu to more WordPress users in a different part of the world. We may soon see Mumbai dabbawala wapuu stickers and shirts?

I also helped staff Automattic’s sponsor table (Jetpack + WooCommerce) along with my 5 of my coworkers. It sounded like WooCommerce is super popular and lots of people were asking Sam technical questions on Jetpack.

Some of the things I noticed that were different from Japanese WordCamps:

  • I saw a huge interest in business and marketing side of things around WordPress.
  • Many of the attendees were super friendly and weren’t shy about coming to say hi.
  • Code/programming-focused sessions outnumbered design/theme dev sessions.
  • Curry and sweets for lunch, and chai for tea break 🍛

Thank you everyone for having me a part of this wonderful event. I can now say for sure that the WordPress community in Mumbai is really strong! Big shout out to the organizing team’s Alex, Aditya, Vachan, Thomson, Ajay, Sahil, Ratnesh, Meher, Amit, Niket, Raj, and Vishal!

WordCamp Mumbai 2016 organizers

WordCamp Mumbai 2016 organizers

WordCamp Tokyo 2014 Design Team’s Showcase Site on GitHub

WordCamp Tokyo 2014 had a very creative and local-friendly website, custom Wapuu logo, and various swags and branding materials — thanks to the awesome design team.

Today, they launched a GitHub Pages site showcasing their creations all in one location.

WordCamp Tokyo 2014 GitHub Repositry List

Wordcam Tokyo 2014 Design Team's Github Repos

In the past years, these kinds of design data used to just sit somewhere in a shared folder of the project management web service we used to organize the event. We then had to dig around and give the right permission to the right people, as members of the design team change from year to year.

They still need to add some resources and tweak it a little, but it’s a great step forward in making it easy to share their work!

Props to Yutaro, Yasushi, and Mayuko for making this happen.

And here are some photos of the event: