Global WordPress Translation Day in Tokyo

September 30 was the third Global WordPress Translation Day (GWTD3).

Global WordPress Translation Day 3

649 translators for 60 different locales added 93,179 translations over the 24-hour period. 346 projects (core, meta, plugins, themes, and apps) got new language pack created as a result.

Meetups & Online Events in Japan

In Japan, there were four local meetups in Tokyo, Nagoya, Osaka, and Ogijima. We also had several online participants on WordSlack, the Slack instance for the Japanese WordPress community.

We held the Translation Day event in Tokyo at Gengo office for the second time following the last year. Active translation contributors Mayuko (Mayo) & Akira (atachibana) were there, and we had a nice mix of new and experienced polyglots.

“How to Make Strings Translator-Friendly” session

From 11 am, three of us did a live session on for the Crowdcast streaming.

The idea of the session came out from a question from WordCamp Tokyo Contributor Day participant. He asked how we should translate ALL CAPS, and some of us said: “we actually don’t have a good way to translate it in Japanese (because the Japanese language doesn’t make use of capitalization)”. Then, Mirucon said the best thing we can do is to try letting developers know not to use language-specific expressions such as this.

Mayuko, Akira, and I gathered some examples of strings that we can’t translate well and I categorized them into four types. I hope this is useful for anyone writing strings for WordPress, its themes & plugins, and any other products to be localized.

Making strings translator-friendly can not only help translators but improves the overall quality of the text for all users. Precise and unambiguous instructions and UI labels can be a great feature on its own.

It’s Fun to Work Together

I was only able to stay until 3 pm since I have kids waiting at home, but I’m glad I was able to join the offline event even for a short time. I enjoyed working side by side with other translators — it’s not something I experience much, as a member of a distributed company.

But working with a remote team was also a fun part of the event. It was great to see the GWTD3 organizing team put together the whole thing with strong teamwork (I’m listed as one of the team members but I had a minimum involvement due to my early maternity leave, the hard work was done by everyone else!).

Suggesting translation is one of the easiest ways to start contributing to the WordPress open source project for those who understand multiple languages.

You don’t have to wait until the next Translation Day to get started 😄

WPTD3-wapuu-512

Migrating Poedit Translation Memory to a Different Computer (Mac)

Poedit stores its translation memory (TM) locally. As I was switching to a new machine, I wondered what’s the safest way to migrate it.

Poedit Preference Screen: Translatin Memory

After I sent a support request, the software author Václav quickly got back to me. According to him, this is the instruction.

  1. Install Poedit on a new machine.
  2. Make hidden files shown on both machines (through Finder or Terminal.app).
  3. With both Poedit apps closed, copy the following directory from your old machine to a place you can access from the other machine (e.g. Dropbox):
    /Users/xxx/Library/Application/Support/Poedit/TranslationMemory
  4. Move the directory to the same location of your new machine.

That’s it! You may be prompted to confirm replacing write.lock and segments.gen files – I said yes to both and it worked fine.

If you are not familiar with dealing with hidden files, it’s better to make hidden files invisible again.

Václav added:

Copying the folder should work fine (even if it’s between platforms), the only thing that would be dangerous would be putting it into a shared folder and accessing from two computers at once.

Translation memory import/export may be added to Poedit in the future, but meanwhile, I hope this is useful!

WordCamp Kyoto 2017 swag: Wapuu Keychain & sticker

WordCamp Kyoto 2017 Photos

WordCamp Kyoto 2017 took place on June 24-25. Around 350 people gathered at Kyoto University and enjoyed the time togeter as WordPress enthusiasts.

Day 0: Travel & Speakers Dinner

On the day before the event, two of my colleagues and I took a bullet train from Tokyo to Kyoto. We walked around Kiyomizudera Temple and Nineizaka, then went to the Speaker’s Dinner in Sijō.

Day 1: Session Day

Saturday was a session day. We arrived at the venue early to set up Automattic (Jetpack/WooCommerce) tables. All went by fast – I gave a talk about WordPress.com (video/sildes), attended a session about translation, and mostly talked to people at the sponsorship table.

The organizing team did a great job excecuting the event, closely focusing around session while keeping a relatively simple overall setup. They had beautiful and very original swag too!

I received some more Wapuu stickers and postcards from Tachibana-san, who went to WordCamp Europe in Paris.

At the after party, I talked some more people… For someone who work alone for most of the days and use typed words as the main means of communication, it felt as if I was intensely training my vocal cord during these WordCamp days.

Day 2: Contributor Day

Then on Sunday, about 100 people participated in the Contributor Day. I helped as a mentor for the documentation and polyglots teams.

It was a very well-organized setup and each team got a lot of things done in a day. There were many first-time contributors — it looked like they had a good time while learning how to get involved in many aspects of the WordPress project.

Day 3: Coworking

On the final day, some of us met up at Tenrō-in Bookstore (天狼院書店) for a little bit of coworking. It’s a renovated old house with two floors of coworking/café space.


This trip made me realize it again that the WordPress community in the Kansai region (= Kyoto, Osaka, Kobe, etc.) is very strong. With multiple local leaders that have experience in organizing WordCamps and meetups, the team is diverse and giving good infulence to each other.

I’m sure they will put together a great WordCamp next year – you should come and see it yourself, and get to know this part of Japan too!

A Day in Ueno Zoo & Children’s Library

It was a sunny Saturday yesterday and we went to the Zoo & the International Museum of Children’s Literature in the Ueno Park area.At the Zoo, Lisa and her friend Hayato enjoyed a monorail ride as well as watching elephants and monkeys.

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Ueno Park, full of lotus leaves

We had lunch at Park Side Cafe, then walked to The International Library of Children’s Literature. The reading room on the first floor had a section of transportation-related books, where both of the kids spent some time opening several books one after another.

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The International Library of Children’s Literature

After saying goodbye to Hayato and his parents, Lisa went on playing at a playground across the zoo. Then we walked by the Shinobazuno-ike pond and head home. She fell asleep on the way back – it was a fun day!

#上野公園 #紫陽花

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Sagamiko, June 2017

Last weekend, we went to the Sagamiko (Lake Sagami) area in Kanagawa prefecture with my friend’s family and some of her coworkers.

We stayed overnight at Sagamiko Pleasure Forest, where an amusement park, campground, and hot spring are all on one site.

キャンプ場の朝。 #breakfast #相模湖

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Since Lisa is two-year-old, there were many rides at the park she wasn’t able to ride. But she had plenty of fun with the merry-go-round, mini-coaster, and several coin-operated car/bus/bike rides (she was really into those).

Picaso-no-tamago was also fun. It’s a giant obstacle course with 27 different types of stuff. It wasn’t easy for us to keep up with her!

Before driving back to Tokyo, we stopped at the public park surrounding the lake to ride a swan/duck boart.

ピンクのあひるボート #相模湖

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Kamakura, May 2017

We took a day trip to Kamakura, which is a town in Kanagawa prefecture 1-hour train ride away from Tokyo Station.

First, we arrived at Kamakura Station around 11:10 and had lunch before it gets crowded. ROOFTOPS near the station was a hit (though you need to be prepared to get really messy!).

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Avocado & grilled tomato burger at ROOFTOPS

Then, we strolled Komachi Dori Street to Tsurugaoka Hachimangu (鶴岡八幡宮) Shrine.

From there, we walked more to see the bamboo grove in Hokokuji Temple (報国寺). The quiet zen garden was a nice contrast to the vivid shrine. Some bamboo shoots and young stalks

We took a local bus and Enoden train to the Great Buddha, then walked by the Yuigahama beach.

Kamakura has so many places you can easily visit within a day. We picked some of the major spots to visit since it was my first time there (Keita’s second), but it felt like I only saw a small portion of this old town. We kept walking around until it’s time to go home.

It’s a great destination to take a short trip to while in Tokyo. So much closer than Kyoto but you still get to see & learn the historical parts of Japan.

Kamakura Travel Guide (japan-guide.com)

Photos: Team Global Meetup in NY

From March 27th to April 1st, I went to New York for my team meetup. We stayed in an Airbnb in Williamsburg, Brooklyn and worked together.

During the week we had all kinds of food – sashimi cocktail, ramen, pizza, Italian/Taiwanese/Australian (home-cooked), and even Peruvian.

We went to Manhattan for a day. Took a ferry across the East River, visited the 911 Memorial site and the One World Observatory, then strolled around the city.

It was my first visit to NY since I had my daughter, so it made me notice things to do with kids. It was fun shopping for her thinking of her reaction and watching other kids around her age in the parks and streets.

Since I first visited NY when I was in high school, the city always gives me realization what I’m interested in at the time of my life because it offers so many things I can choose to do. I look forward to going there again and discovering more of myself.