Open Source Summit Japan 2019

Last week, I volunteered at Open Source Summit Japan, a professional conference hosted by the Linux Foundation.

This was my first ever presence at this event. Although I’m not new to attending or staffing at events, I learned quite a lot of things from both perspectives.

“From User to Contributor” Talk by Riona MacNamara

Riona’s talk “From User to Contributor: How Documentation Enables Vibrant Open Source Communities” was excellent. Since I’m in the middle of organizing upcoming events (WordCamp Tokyo & Asia) and still figuring out the best way to program Contributor Day, it was perfect timing to understand contributor personas and blockers.

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Riona MacNamara

Not only that, her talk was a good reminder of why we should help othrers to contribute. Her different talk from Write the Docs conference is available on YouTube. Some of the key ideas I resonated are also in this one – well worth your 15 minutes!

Women in Open Source Lunch

Another highlight of the conference for me was attending Women in Open Source Lunch. Thanks to Sato-san & Fukuyasu-san frin Linux Foundation Japan (who also invited me to volunteer), I found out about the opportunity to meet more people in the field.

At my table, Sarah Novotony, Patricia Ferreiro, Raona Roess, and I talked about a wide range of topics like career path, mentoring/leadership, and continuing education. I feel very lucky to have had a chance to spend some time with them!

Volunteering in a New Community

I also got to meet other open source community leaders/members in Japan through volunteering. Between our shifts, we exchanged ideas about event organization and community management.

Overall, I’m so glad I decided to go to this event! I even wish I had done it sooner. I look forward to going back again in the future.


Header photo credit: The Linux Foundation (CC BY-NC 2.0)

“Kodomo no Yu” Sentō-themed Ball Pit at Tokyo Skytree

Yesterday, we met a friend of mine and her family at Skytree Soramachi and spent the morning at Kodomo no Yu (こどもの湯) play area. It’s an indoor ball pit that looks like a sentō, Japanese-style bathhouse.

My 4-and-half-year old daughter jumped right into the pool of balls and even made a new friend. Her younger brother, who is 1 year and 9 months old, was a bit careful at first but it didn’t take too long before he got into it.

The area called “Festival Square” is not a big space but they had a good time playing at kids-size storefronts (takoyaki, sushi, and veggie shops).

Until May 6, you can see 1,000 Koinobori carp streamer under Skytree as well 🎏

Sakura in Tokyo, 2018

It felt like this spring was the best sakura (cherry blossom) season in Tokyo since I had moved here 7 years ago. The blossoms started early, but the weather during the full bloom was warm and less windy/rainy than I had experienced in the past.

I fully enjoyed the flowers by taking many walks and going hanami picnics.

March 17

Early blossoms outside of the Imperial Palace, where I biked along with my new battery-assisted e-bike.

First fully bloomed tree I saw this year, near Iidabashi Station.

March 23

Another one right above the railroad of Sōbu-Chūō Line at Iidabashi Station.

March 24

Walked around Akagi Jinja/Shrine.

The darker pink kind I spotted while my daughter Lisa played in a park.

March 25

This was the best day of the season for me. Sakura at their most beautiful time.

March 27

I took kids to a quick night picnic. Lisa liked it so much she kept saying she wanted to go again. Hopefully, we can do that next year!

March 31

Back at the Imperial Palace area — picnic at Kitanomaru Park with some local families.

April 1

Last hanami for the year at Koishikawa Botanical Garden. It was a windy day, and the fallen petals looked like snowflakes.

Sakura season is so short and unpredictable, but that makes it even more precious. 🌸